AcuPartD

Keeping you updated on the latest Medicare and Part D news


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Opioid prescription patterns linked to likelihood of long-term use

A recent study has found that opioid days supply and the number of prescriptions in the first episode of opioid use can greatly affect the likelihood a patient will become an opioid chronic user.  The study examined a random sample of opioid-naive adults without cancer that received a prescription for opioid pain relievers.  Starting with the third day, the risk of becoming a chronic opioid user grows with each day additional day supply provided to patients.  Prescribing opioids is increasingly becoming a complicated decision for doctors to make.

FIGURE 1. One- and 3-year probabilities of continued opioid use among opioid-naïve patients, by number of days’ supply* of the first opioid prescription — United States, 2006–2015

	The figure above is a line chart showing 1- and 3-year probabilities of continued opioid use among opioid-naïve patients, by number of days’ supply of the first opioid prescription in the United States during 2006–2015.

* Days’ supply of the first prescription is expressed in days (1–40) in 1-day increments. If a patient had multiple prescriptions on the first day, the prescription with the longest days’ supply was considered the first prescription.

 

FIGURE 2. One- and 3-year probabilities of continued opioid use among opioid-naïve patients, by number of prescriptions* in the first episode of opioid use — United States, 2006–2015

	The figure above is a line chart showing 1- and 3-year probabilities of continued opioid use among opioid-naïve patients, by number of prescriptions in the first episode of opioid use, in the United States during 2006–2015.

* Number of prescriptions is expressed as 1–15, in increments of one prescription.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6610a1.htm

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15 maps and charts visualizing the opioid epidemic in the United States

Vox.com has compiled 15 maps, charts, and graphs that visually depict the opioid epidemic that affects millions of Americans annually. Highlights and a link to the source below:

Chart showing that the number of days an opioid is prescribed matters for curtailing continued use

Chart showing that the number of Americans reporting chronic pain has increased from 1998 to 2010.

http://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/3/23/14987892/opioid-heroin-epidemic-charts